ACA premium rates down in Pa., but some people may owe more

Premium rates for health insurance plans sold through the Affordable Care Act marketplace are going down in 2019, but Philadelphia-area residents who bought plans with a tax subsidy last year may be in store for sticker shock when they receive their renewal notices.

What to know about health care and insurance for the 2018 midterm elections

Health care is top of mind for Republicans and Democrats alike leading into midterm elections.

What to know about health care and insurance for the 2018 midterm elections

Health care is top of mind for Republicans and Democrats alike leading into midterm elections.

Premiums for ACA health plans to decline 16 percent in Pa.

Individual rates for the second-lowest cost silver plan in 2019 will decline an average of 16 percent in Pennsylvania and an average of 15 percent in New Jersey.

Premiums for ACA health plans to decline 16 percent in Pa.

Individual rates for the second-lowest cost silver plan in 2019 will decline an average of 16 percent in Pennsylvania and an average of 15 percent in New Jersey.

Former mayor Nutter is selling Medicare. Should his plan be yours?

Former Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter wants to make his second act helping the city's seniors access health care, but patient advocates and policy experts say he's sending the wrong message.

Former mayor Nutter is selling Medicare. Should his plan be yours?

Former Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter wants to make his second act helping the city's seniors access health care, but patient advocates and policy experts say he's sending the wrong message.
More Stories

5 things to know about Pa.’s health insurance marketplace open enrollment

Pennsylvanians shopping for health insurance at healthcare.gov may find the experience as good as—or in some ways even better than—last year's.

Opening the healthcare profession pipeline for every student in Philadelphia

Some minorities are not fully represented in the student bodies of many health professions schools. Similarly, low-income students are much less likely to pursue a health care career.

A lethal game of chicken: the next trade war with China could be a matter of life and death

The most important trade war to come may have nothing to do with cars, steel or soybeans. It may involve a virus.

Patients beware: price transparency can actually hurt you

Earlier this summer, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services floated proposals to expand price transparency—price lists for services the costs of which consumers usually have no advance notice. CMS stated a concern that "challenges continue to exist for patients due to insufficient price transparency," including "patients being surprised by out-of-network bills for physicians, such as anesthesiologists and radiologists, who provide services at in-network hospitals [and] physician fees for emergency department visits."

How an undercount of 2020 census could impact Pennsylvania’s health-care funding

The census has direct bearing on how hundreds of billions of federal dollars nationwide are allocated to states, affecting the funds that states receive for Medicaid, CHIP, and other critical programs that help people stay healthy, such as food stamps.

Even after political assaults, Obamacare is looking much healthier

Reports of the death of Affordable Care Act insurance markets are extremely premature. After years of steady price increases, insurer exits, and the Trump administration's relentless campaign to create instability, there are signs that in some states they are healthier than ever.

Medicare wants to cut hospital outpatient facility fees, and that’s good for patients

If the patient received the same services in an independent physician office practice, they are charged only for the medical care they receive during the visit, not the add-on facility fee they face in a hospital-owned outpatient clinic.

Short-term health insurance coverage is almost worthless

The Trump Administration is promoting short-term health insurance products as an alternative to coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Much of the news coverage and political debate surrounding short-term products has emphasized that they threaten the viability of the ACA's unified risk pooling and exclude coverage of certain essential health benefits. However, a closer look at the scant publicly-available details of these products raises worries of a more basic problem: many appear to be low-value products that won't pay out the benefits consumers need and expect in a time of crisis, and will pay amounts that are disproportionately low in relation to their premium.

Thousands of older children also were separated at the border. What happens to them?

A Philadelphia pediatrician shares why, after years of experience with children growing up in the foster care system, he is worried about the future of children and families facing long and even permanent separation.

Telemedicine could improve Pennsylvania health care. So why the hold-up over insurance?

Pennsylvania hospitals and other providers want to expand their telehealth services. But that means investing in technology, equipment, and new ways of providing medical care. That's difficult for hospitals to do without knowing if insurance companies will pay for these services.

Primary-care doctors deserve more respect. Their patients’ health depends on it

Many people believe the best medical care comes from a bevy of specialists, but it may be that none of them is looking at the whole patient.

Let’s promote health and green space one empty lot at a time

For Philadelphia, a city with high poverty rates and poor health outcomes, creating more parks close to where people live can greatly improve overall quality of life.
Wellness
‘Carb cycling’ adds a new spin to a low-carbohydrate diet

Should I wear a weightlifting belt?
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